HUSSMAN: There’s No Jobs Recovery, Just Older Workers ‘Desperate’ To Grab Any Menial Job They Can

In his latest weekly commentary, fund manager John Hussman takes on a few ideas.

First he says that Friday’s jobs report wasn’t a surprise, and that April will be worse.

Then he talks about the liquidity-fueled bubble, and a market addicted to more Fed sugar.

Then he takes on the idea that there’s been some fundamental improvement in the economy since the market bottom.

What looks like job growth, he says, really just reeks of desperation.

Last week, we observed “Real income declined month-over-month in the latest report, which is very much at odds with the job creation figures unless that job creation reflects extraordinarily low-paying jobs. Real disposable income growth has now dropped to just 0.3% year-over-year, which is lower than the rate that is typically observed even in recessions.” It wasn’t quite clear what was going on until I read a comment by David Rosenberg, who noted that much of the recent growth in payrolls has been in “55 years and over” cohort. Suddenly, 2 and 2 became 4.

If you dig into the payroll data, the picture that emerges is breathtaking. Since the recession “ended” in June 2009, total non-farm payrolls in the U.S. have grown by 1.84 million jobs. However, if we look at workers 55 years of age and over, we find that employment in that group has increased by 2.96 million jobs. In contrast, employment among workers under age 55 has actually contracted by 1.12 million jobs. Even over the past year, the vast majority of job creation has been in the 55-and-over group, while employment has been sluggish for all other workers, and has already turned down. (Read more)

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